That's What They Say | Michigan Radio

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      WUOMFM

      That's What They Say

      Sunday at 9:35 AM

      Funner, snuck, and LOL are all things that we're hearing people say these days.

      That's What They Say is a weekly segment on Michigan Radio that explores our changing language.University of Michigan English Professor Anne Curzan studies linguistics and the history of the English language. Each week she'll discuss why we say what we say with Michigan Radio Weekend Edition host Rebecca Kruth.

      That's What They Say airs Sundays at 9:35 a.m. on Michigan Radio and you can podcast it here.

      Do you have an English or grammar question? Ask us here!

      An evening of drinking beer and talking about grammar? Yes please.

      Last week, we were thrilled to dust off our pint glasses and host another Grammar Night for Michigan Radio's Issues & Ale @ Home series.?

      Grammar Night is always a lot of fun, and we get a lot of great questions. We can't get to them all, but we appreciate each and every one, including Harvey Pillersdorf's question about "each and every."?


      Today we’ll dispose of not one but two listener questions. No, that doesn’t mean we’re going to throw their questions away. It means we’ll use the information we have at our disposal to answer them, so to speak.

      Starting with a question about “disposal.”

      To know or to beknow? That is, well, not actually the question. However, there is some debate over whether something is “unbeknown” or “unbeknownst.”

      Listener Randy Miller brought this up after coming across “unbeknown” in a piece in a major newspaper.


      If you have an older sister, you can also have an elder sister. However, if you have an older house, you don’t also have an elder house. We’ll talk about why in a bit.

      As to why we’re even talking about “older” and “elder,” a listener recently asked us to settle a debate.


      During the pandemic, many of us have spent much of our time at home cleaning out closets, basements and garages, getting rid of things we no longer use or need.

      Sometimes editors of dictionaries have to do the same thing. When new words are added, obsolete words get scrapped to make room.

      We're talking about print dictionaries, of course: actual books with pages. Books that will keep getting bigger and heavier if cuts aren't made.


      It can be helpful, as well as potentially confusing, to have vague expressions of time such as “by and by.”

      The more we thought about this expression, the more trouble we had trying to think of how we even use “by and by.”

      Sure, it shows up in poetry and music, but those contexts don’t exactly lend themselves to everyday use.


      In honor of tax season, Merriam Webster recently tweeted?the origins of “mortgage.” It’s derived from two Old French words meaning “death” and “pledge.”

      Though "death pledge" probably sounds about right to some of you, others might be wondering how "mortgage" ended up? with such a dark origin story.


      We're not exactly sure what effect the internet and other changes in technology are having on English. It could be that changes in the language are speeding up.

      What we do know is that English is spreading around the world in a way we've never seen before. In the process, it's coming into contact with languages all over the world.

      As we've seen in the past, language contact is one of the things that can speed up language change.


      It's clearly different to talk about a large country and the country at large, but these two meanings of "large" are historically related.

      A listener named Edward Kudla recently wrote to us with a "large question." Edward wanted to know about the various ways we can use "large" including, "I wear a large shirt," and "the escaped convict is at large."

      By and large, we were glad to look into “large.”


      Something that’s out of your hands is different from something that’s out of hand, which is usually different from something that’s offhand. So which phrase goes where??

      When our listener Bruce Sagan heard one of these phrases on Morning Edition recently, he wondered whether it was used correctly.

      ??

      This week we're getting back to our roots. Our Latin roots, that is.

      A listener named Seth Epstein asked us how to pronounce the Latin phrase "in situ." He says, "I've heard it as in-sigh-too, or in-see-too, but I learned it as in-sit-choo."

      This is just one of the Latin phrases that have become part of English with variable pronunciation.


      There are pundits who really don't like it if people call them "pundents." As a listener pointed out to us, this mispronunciation isn't uncommon.

      Susan Serafin Jess says, "The otherwise fastidious Jim Lehrer said ['pundent' for 'pundit'] throughout his tenure on the PBS News Hour. I have heard other journalists misuse this, including on WUOM."


      This week we looked at two words that have nothing to do with each other, aside from the fact that they both begin with “p.” At least they’ve got one thing in common.

      Our first “p” word is “pound.” Our listener Jay Winegarden often hears people use the phrase “pounding beers” or something similar when relaying a drinking story.


      We keep track of things, we lose track of things, we run track, and listen to tracks. Sometimes though, we confuse “track” with “tract.”

      Recently, a graduate student who works closely with Professor Anne Curzan pointed out a job posting for a “tenure tract” position.

      Our listener Susan Lessian is a Boston transplant who says she still struggles with some "midwesternisms," despite having moved here years ago.

      She says, "The one that disturbs me the most is the use of 'can't hardly' for 'can hardly.' Isn't this actually a double negative?"

      Susan is right that many usage guides have classified "can't hardly" as a double negative. But the situation is more complicated than that.


      Many of us were taught that a sentence should never end with a preposition. However, some sentences just sound better when they do.


      Generally, the word “either” is pronounced either with a long “I” sound or a short “I” sound. People on both sides have pledged loyalty to their particular pronunciation.

      Either way, we think there’s a more interesting debate to be had over this word.


      The rule about when to use "between" and when to use "among" seems straightforward, until you look more closely. Then it's not straightforward at all.

      Our listener Lowell Boileau wanted to know what we think about this rule:

      "My understanding is that 'between' is for 'between two parties' and 'among' is for 'among three or more parties.'? Yet I hear and read 'between' frequently used in reference to three or more."

      Many of us grew up with this exact same rule, but Lowell is right. Not everyone follows it.

      When we describe someone as “obtuse,” there are clear negative connotations. The scope of those connotations has been expanding, perhaps because of the word “abstruse.”

      “Abstruse” came on our radar recently when Professor Anne Curzan received an email with this subject line: “I thought this word was a joke: abstruse.”


      On this week's That's What They Say, English Professor Anne Curzan fills us in on the American Dialect Society's annual "Word of the Year" vote.

      The fact that this year's selection was the first ever to be held virtually should give you a big clue about the winner.?


      If someone tells you to leave your keys on the dash, you probably know right where to leave them -- on top of the panel in your car that displays controls and information, i.e. the dashboard.

      A listener recently pointed out to us that the "board" part of this compound sort of makes sense, but what's going on with "dash"?

      It's tempting to assume it has something to do with speed, but that's not the case.


      You’re probably familiar with the phrase “batten down the hatches,” especially if you’ve ever turned on the Weather Channel before a major storm.?

      A colleague of Professor Anne Curzan recently asked us though, can “batten” pair with anything else? Good question.


      Last week on?That's What They Say, we talked about a peeve over "exasperate" getting used in place of? "exacerbate." This week, we looked at two more words that often get entangled, "trammel" and "trample."

      Professor Anne Curzan ran across "trammel" while researching last week's show. While we're very familiar with things like "untrammeled access" or "untrammeled nature," "trammel" on its own raised a flag.

      The words "exacerbate" and "exasperate" look and sound very similar. That could explain why people sometimes say "exasperate" when they mean "exacerbate," as our listner Judy Nikolai? has noticed.

      "Once or twice I've even heard reporters or interviewees on NPR employ what I believe is this incorrect usage," she says.


      Some words sound similar but don't have anything to do with each other. Others sound similar and have everything to do with each other.?

      When a listener asked us about "ornery," we had no idea that it fell into the latter category, alongside "ordinary." They do sound similar, but how are they related?


      In the aftermath of Tuesday’s election, we found ourselves wondering about the history of “aftermath.”

      A listener named Sybil Kolon put "aftermath" on our radar a couple of weeks ago. This past week, we noticed people from all over the political spectrum using it in discussions of a post-election world.


      Our clocks fell back by an hour Sunday morning. As they did, a much-discussed usage issue once again raised its head.

      Though most of us would agree the extra hour of sleep is nice, there’s contention over what we call this particular event.


      When it’s “all downhill from here,” there’s some ambiguity about whether that’s a good thing or a bad thing.

      A friend of Professor Anne Curzan recently pointed out that the issue with this expression is that it’s almost an auto antonym. That is, a word or expression that can mean its opposite.


      Sometimes we get a language question that leads to another question. That question leads to another question, and before we know it, we’ve fallen down a language rabbit hole.

      A listener recently asked us if the phrase “apple of my eye” can be plural. The answer is yes. You could call your children “the apples of my eye.” You and your partner could also call your children “the apples of our eyes.”

      This got us thinking about other phrases where there’s a question about which part to make plural. Specifically, we started thinking about phrases like “father-in-law” and “brother-in-law.”


      Most people would agree that a lamb would make a terrible escape vehicle. All that bleating would instantly give away even the stealthiest of fugitives.

      Fortunately, a spelling discrepancy clarifies that going "on the lam" doesn't mean riding away on a baby sheep. It does make us wonder though, what exactly is a “lam” anyway??

      ?

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